Sunday, January 08, 2006

Having a go at oil



Well, here's my first attempt at an oil painting in about three years or so. It may turn into something I enjoy, or end in total disaster. It's basically just of a photo I took this summer that I really like. Giant cow on Bell Island. I may post another image or two before it's finished.
(measures about 3.5' x 4.5')

5 comments:

Dave Sheppard said...

Hi Jennifer. It seems WAY to early to give any real constructive critism. The only thing I can recommend -being a painter- is to start by laying down each part of the painting (the sky, grass, cow, etc) with the darkest version of it's colour. Let it dry, then start adding the shades through tones and finally tints. There is no harm in letting it dry between each session as you work up the greyscale. This is of course how I work. It may not work for the effect or style you have in mind. D

Jennifer B. said...

Thanks Dave -- I never considered painting that way before. Of course, I don't know a whole lot about painting in general. Always assumed light to dark was best. I'll certainly give your way a try at some point. I really appreciate your advice.

Jennifer B. said...

Dave - a question: when you paint (like in the one there by your post, for example), do you use models, or what? How do you know how to paint the light, exactly? I haven't seen this dude walking around with a bird's head yet...

Dave Sheppard said...

It's really a mixture. These days I try to use models for the human and clothes bits, simply because it makes life easier and saves a lot of time, instead of working and re working something til it looks right. I do have some pieces that I used no human model when creating and just did it on the fly. A Reader in Woody Point and Sadness, Like a Fish out of Water, for example (though books on anatomy helped piece 'Sadnes' together during the drawing stage. As for the heads, I try to have references, but the lighting and pose is rarely the same. To make those sort of adjustments you really have to be able to visualize a shape turned in space. Kinda like drawing cones, ovals, etc from different perspectives. Understanding lighting and how to paint light takes time and, for me, years of observation. It never just falls into place. I usually end a days work on a head frustrated that it STILL doesn't look right. Baby steps til it finally falls into place. Hope this helps. Dave

Jennifer B. said...

Cheers Dave, I really like to hear how other people work. Thanks for the insight.